A Lesson in Sewing Machines, Threads, Machine Needles or Three The Hard Way

yeah. so the title says it all.

I was 12 years old when I began sewing on a sewing machine. While I was growing up I always watched my mother and grandmother while they sewed. They made the most fabulous things imaginable! I dreamed then, as I do still, of things I could sew… things I could create… things that I wanted to make for myself… or to make for others… and today… to sell.

I had 5 years of sewing classes in junior high and high school. I was always top of my class… I was the teacher’s helper and the teacher’s pet. I still practice and apply, rather diligently, the principles I learned then.

I am now 51 and find I was not taught all I thought I needed to know… but then, I realize, I was taught to use a homemaker’s machine… not a commercial machine. I was taught to use practical applications and principles for homemaker grade machines. I was told to “NEVER TOUCH THE TENSION KNOB”, and I never did… and I didn’t know why. I asked why, and was told “BECAUSE”. I wasn’t taught why I shouldn’t. I wasn’t told what tension was. I just accepted it. I have lived and have sewn with this “DO NOT TOUCH” mentality… until recently…

*sigh*

I have a friend that fixes sewing machines… well… actually, he fixes everything… he is amazing. AHHHHhhhmmazzzing! Well, when I first started having issues with my sewing machines… he basically made me feel like I was an idiot because I did not know how to figure out what was wrong with my machine. He sent me website links and various information about how to fix your own sewing machine… and now, I know how to do these things. His case in point: I am capable of fixing my machine.

So, when I called him about the issues of broken needles, he sparked, or rather, pinched, my “idiot” nerve again.

Broken needles? Not the needle’s problem. (Boy, was I mad. How dare he tell me that? After all, I was using the correct needle! Yeah… What I thought was the correct needle…)

 

So after researching, I found out that the machine can only do what it was built for. Reality check: My machine was built for the average sewer, the homemaker who makes day dresses for herself and pajamas for her kids… NOT as an industrial machine that could, or was built for, sewing 8 – 12 layers of denim or leather – successfully.

The needles. Um, okay, I never realized how many kinds of needles there were… I mean I know there are needles for various types of fabrics. But to accommodate specific threads… nah. (WHAT!?)

The thread. well… did you know that there are specific threads for specific purposes as well as for specific fabrics? I did not. I do now.

All of these concepts and realizations are very foreign to me. I am willing to learn though! FIELD TRIP! I am going to have to go to various fabric shops now to see and compare things. (A field trip for my self-learning class , if you will)

I will give a full report of my findings when I go on my field trip to the fabric shops researching needles and thread… (I will just HAVE to shop a bit for something wonderful to add to my fabric hoard, er, I mean stash)

see yah!

PS: I am flustered too much to even begin to share the links that I found the various thread/needle/fabric information, besides, I am sure there will be more. My next post will have the plethora of links I found.

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About robbiekw

I am an insatiably talented three-dimensional artist. I cannot get enough creating done in the day! I love nature and the gifts our world offers us. I love to recycle and repurpose things, but denim is my fondest thing to create with. Come on in and see what I am up to!
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